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4 Ways Retailers Can Sell More This Mother’s Day

4 Ways Retailers Can Sell More This Mother’s Day

Editor’s Note: COVID-19 has drastically changed the retail environment and traditional methods used to increase retail sales may not be as effective as they once were. With that being said, this article has been updated with new recommendations to help retailers increase their sales during the pandemic.

Despite the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, shoppers are expected to spend big this Mother’s day. According to the NRF, Mother’s Day spending is estimated to total a record $28.1 billion this year.

Below, we’ll go over how consumers are adapting their gifting plans in light of the pandemic.

Keep reading to find out how you can increase your Mother’s Day sales by taking advantage of consumer spending habits.

4 Ways to Sell More on Mother’s Day

1) Offer Convenience

About ¼ of shoppers state that convenience is most important when picking out a Mother’s Day gift. So make it easy for busy shoppers to find a special gift – both in your store and on your website.

Consider creating a point of purchase display that features all your Mother’s Day merchandise. You can even use signage to lead shoppers to the display. This way, busy shoppers can grab and go.

Mother's Day

If you are located in a region impacted by COVID-19 lockdowns, take advantage of your website or ecommerce store instead. In particular, displaying a Mother Day’s section on your website is a great way to increase sales. To make things convenient for your shoppers, add product recommendations. For example, dedicate a part of your website to “Top Products for Mother’s Day” or “Most Popular Gifts for Mom”.

For those retailers with ecommerce stores, highlighting popular fulfillment options on your site is another way to increase convenience. As an example, you can encourage shoppers to purchase products safely with a BOPIS option.

2) Give Your Shoppers Gifting Inspiration

More than 8 in 10 shoppers state that they are looking to retailers for gifting inspiration. You can cater to these shoppers by creating a gift guide to give your customers some ideas.

Start by creating a list of items for different types of mother figures (gifts for an aunt, grandmother, godmother, and new mom etc.). The gift guide should feature merchandise from your store but you can also include some homemade gift ideas too.

It’s important that you make it easy for shoppers to find your gift guide. Since most shoppers will be searching the web for inspiration, display the guide on your website homepage. Include a call to action such as: “Thinking about what to get mom? Check out our Mother’s Day gift guide!”

Not only will this create a better shopping experience for your customers, it will also help you appear higher up in search results.

You can also create email guides to send to your mailing list and printable guides to give to walk-in shoppers.

Mother's Day Retail

3) Run Google Shopping Ads for Last Minute Shoppers

With 83% of adults expected to celebrate Mother’s Day, you can bet that there will be last minute shoppers desperately searching online for gift ideas. So target local shoppers who don’t have time to spend on gift shopping by listing your products and promotions on Google with GoogleAds.

Here are some tips for driving traffic to your website or store prior to Mother’s Day:

  • Create a separate campaign for your Mother’s Day merchandise. This can be done with custom labels. Ultimately, this will help increase your online visibility and reduce your spending costs.
  • Use remarketing lists to target shoppers who are already familiar with your web site. This includes returning shoppers, previous visitors, and those who abandoned their shopping carts online.
  • Use descriptive titles and high-quality images.
  • 15% of shoppers are focused on finding a cost-effective gift. So make sure your promotions are displayed through your Merchant Center.
  • Use holiday keywords in your title and descriptions. Consider targeting general keywords such as “Mother’s Day Gift”, “Gift Ideas for Mother’s Day”, “Mother’s Day Flowers” and so on.
Google Ads

4) Mother’s Day Gift Baskets

44% of shoppers are looking to find a gift that is unique or different.

That’s why it’s a great idea to create unique gift baskets for different shoppers

Some good ideas include a Mother’s Day Skincare Gift Basket and a Mother’s Day Healthy Snack Gift Basket. Click here for more Mother’s Day basket ideas.

Gift baskets are a great solution for shoppers who are unsure of what to gift their Mom. Group discounted items with regular price items in each basket. This way, shoppers feel that they are getting more than what they paid for. Not only are gift baskets convenient for shoppers, they present the perfect opportunity to up-sell and cross-sell.

Up-sell by suggesting gift baskets to every shopper in your store. Bundling products in a gift basket will help increase your store’s average order value. Cross-sell by placing smaller gift baskets near the checkout area so shoppers can easily and affordably add them to their orders.

Again, if your store is not able to operate due to COVID-19 related lockdowns, you can always highlight different gift baskets on your website or ecommerce store.

Mother's Day Gift Basket

We hope you found these tips helpful. Happy Mother’s Day and happy selling!

#Mothersday #retailtips #retailmarketing #retailsales #cloudpos #sellmore

Easter Tips to Increase Your Retail Sales

Easter Tips to Increase Your Retail Sales

Easter is right around the corner and after a year of COVID-19 related restrictions and lockdowns, shoppers are looking forward to celebrating safely with their friends and family. As a result, retail owners can expect to see an increase in sales.

Considering factors such as positive trends in vaccinations, new stimulus funds, as well as growing consumer confidence, the NRF’s annual Easter survey indicates that there is a lot of momentum going into the Spring. This momentum is reflected in consumer spending as 79% of shoppers are expected to celebrate, spending an average of $179.70.

Below, we’ve prepared some tips to help you gear up for the Easter holiday weekend and make the most of this year’s consumer spending habits.

1. Offer Discounts and Promotions

While not every shopper plans to celebrate, plenty of them will still be on the lookout for Easter related sales. According to the NRF, more than half (52 percent) of those who don’t celebrate Easter still plan to take advantage of these deals and expect to spend an average of $21.11.

To tempt more shoppers to buy from your store, consider discounting your best selling items. You can even set up a dedicated landing page or section on your website/e-commerce site so shoppers can easily browse through sale or seasonal items.

For example, Mastermind Toys set up an Easter landing page encouraging consumers to shop their Easter merchandise.

Mastermind Toys

2. Reposition Your Products for Easter

Don’t sell chocolate or Easter related products? That’s ok – you don’t have to sell Easter merchandise to benefit from the holiday.

You can always position your products for Easter by finding a unique angle. For example, The Body Shop encouraged customers to celebrate the holiday by treating their loved ones and themselves with their nature inspired products.

The Body Shop

Bath and Body Works did something similar with their slogan “Gifts For Every Bunny (And Basket)”.

3. Launch Retargeting Campaigns

It may be a good idea to attract old visitors back to your website with Easter offers and promotions. You can do so with Facebook retargeting ads.

By setting up your Facebook pixel on your website or ecommerce store, you can present different offers based on shoppers’ interaction with your site. The idea is to retarget past users based on their buying intent (e.g. visitors who added to their cart vs shoppers that initiated checkout).

If you are using TAKU eCommerce, click here to find out how to set up your Facebook pixel on your ecommerce site.

Retargeting Ads

While pandemic related restrictions and lockdowns are easing in some regions, many consumers still prefer popular fulfillment options such as buy online pick-up in-store (BOPIS), local delivery, and shipping.

You can encourage shoppers to purchase their Easter gifts safely by highlighting some of these fulfillment options on your website. For example, Indigo’s home page calls attention to the fact that shoppers can purchase their Easter items safely with a BOPIS option.

5. Launch a Giveaway on Social Media

An Easter giveaway on social media can be done with little effort and a minimal budget. For instance, you could do a classic giveaway by asking participants to tag a loved one in the comments.

Or you could do something directly related to Easter by asking your followers to guess how many Easter eggs are in a basket. Alternatively, you can apply this concept to one of your products (e.g. making followers guess the weight of chocolate, the amount of beads in a necklace etc.).

Consider boosting your social media giveaway to widen your reach and increase the number of participants.


We hope you found these tips helpful! For more helpful retail tips, you can subscribe to our blog.

Happy Easter and happy selling!

Step 1: How to Move Your Physical Store Online

Step 1: How to Move Your Physical Store Online

The COVID-19 pandemic has created a new reality for retailers and consumers alike. Now more than ever, consumers are spending their time searching online and browsing the internet. As a result, it has become increasingly important for retailers to move their physical stores online.

But going digital doesn’t have to be complicated. In fact, it’s very possible to grow your business using the internet without actually selling anything online.

While we always encourage merchants to take orders online, and an e-commerce site can be an effective way to build an online presence, it is not the only way of doing things. Whether or not you have an online store, it will be extremely helpful for you to drive more foot traffic, more sales, and brand awareness using the internet.

So even if you aren’t ready to start selling online tomorrow, you can approach the process step-by-step. The entire 5-step process will be covered in this blog and video series.

Step 1: Be Found Online 

Oftentimes, the first place that a customer learns about your business is the internet. Whether they’re searching on Google or discover you through an Instagram ad, your store’s digital storefront allows customers to interact with your business (calls, visits, or purchases etc.) even before they’re in your store.

What is a Digital Storefront? 

A digital storefront is everything that a customer can find about your business online, including the following components: 

  • Your Google My Business listing(s) in search results (and if your listings are complete and optimized) 
  • Online customer reviews
  • Social media profiles
  • Your website (with or without an e-commerce component) 
  • If your website is optimized for mobile devices (also called mobile responsiveness) 
  • Online advertisements
  • Visual elements of your business including photos and videos
Digital storefront

How Your Digital Storefront Impacts your Retail Business 

Online and in-store shopping were once seen as separate channels, competing for traffic and sales. But this is no longer the case. In fact, the future of retail relies on the two working together to deliver a seamless and complete customer experience, otherwise known as omnichannel retail. 

For retailers, the case for going omnichannel then becomes obvious. According to Google, today’s shoppers like to browse and research online even in cases where they intend to buy in-store. Omnichannel retail recognizes that shoppers often flip back and forth between multiple channels. With omnichannel retail, different channels work together and are tightly integrated; resulting in a seamless shopping experience for customers. 

Even though moving towards omnichannel requires change and investment across a retailer’s business operations (technology, processes, staff etc.), it can be done in a step-by-step process. Below, we’ve outlined the necessary steps that are involved in becoming an omnichannel retailer. 

How to Become an Omnichannel Retailer 

Building your Digital Storefront

1. Be Found Online

Even for retailers that only sell out of brick and mortar stores, being found online is crucial for attracting foot traffic and sales. In fact, research shows that digital now drives a surprising number of in-store sales; 83% of U.S. shoppers who visited a store within the last week say they used online search before going in store. 

The following are some tools you can use to help your business be found online: 

Google My Business

Google My Business (GMB) is a free online listing tool that helps retailers manage how their business appears on both Google Search and Maps. By verifying and optimizing your business listing, you can help local shoppers find you. Retailers can start by adding basic information such as address, phone number, store hours, and website URL. Then add details such as store and product photos, store description, and services etc. It’s also a good idea to get added to other local directory listings such as Yelp, Bing Local, Yahoo, Foursquare etc. 

To learn more about Google My Business and the steps you can take to optimize your listing, download our ebook here

Remember, 3 in 4 shoppers who find local retail information in search results helpful are more likely to visit stores. As there are billions of searches conducted on Google each day, GMB is the best platform to get your business in front of more shoppers. 

Google My Business
Online reviews and ratings

When shoppers search for businesses on the web, online reviews from sites such as Yelp often appear. These customer reviews (if they are positive) can help drive more people to visit your store. On the other hand, negative reviews are likely to drive them away – which is why it’s important to monitor them carefully to maintain a good image.

It’s crucial for retailers to respond to all of their customer reviews – both negative and positive. In fact, even if you receive a negative review, a quick response helps to highlight good customer service to potential customers. To learn more about how to manage online customer reviews, click here. 

If you want your retail business to sell more, it’s good to collect more customer reviews. Find out how to get more customer reviews here. 

Customer reviews
Social Media

Social media can be a very effective platform for increasing brand awareness and attracting new customers. However, you need to know where your customers are digitally (e.g. which social platforms they hang around) before you can begin using social media to try and attract customers. 

For example, if your target audience is an older demographic (50+), you have a better chance at success if you’re using Facebook rather than Instagram. 

Retailers are advised to do research and figure out the top social platform(s) that their target demographic spends time on. From there, you can figure out the best practices for marketing on that platform. Remember – it may be tempting to be on every single platform, but by focusing on one, you have a better chance of learning it thoroughly and having success. 

Social media
Your Website

Your website has a major impact on how shoppers feel about your retail business. From the design, site speed, and product showcase, your store’s website is often the first impression customers have of your business. Remember – an e-commerce component is not a requirement for having a website. Sure, your customers may want it or expect it (especially in the aftermath of the COVID-19 lockdowns) but the purpose of any website is to drive traffic, sales, and awareness. Merchants should not let the fear of e-commerce prevent them from setting up at least an informational website. 

The point is, building a website is an incredibly important step in establishing your store’s digital storefront. There are millions of local searches that take place everyday on Google and your business will show up higher in search results if you have a website which will drive more foot traffic to your store. In fact, 88% of people who conduct a local search on their smartphone visit a related store within a week. So, do your part by setting up your website and give potential customers a better chance to find you online before your competitors. 

A website can also serve as a starting point for you to add new retail tech into your operations. For example, while customers may not be able to purchase directly from your website (if you don’t have e-commerce yet), they can still use it to browse through your merchandise. Or, you can use live chat software to answer customer questions and offer customer service in real-time.

If you would like to learn more about how to easily set up a website for your retail business, click here

Store website

To learn more about the next steps to getting your physical store online, keep an eye out for the rest of our blog and video series.

How to Reduce the Cost of Retail Returns

How to Reduce the Cost of Retail Returns

Whether you sell online or in-store, returns are an inevitable cost in the retail industry. And they can be tricky – they can increase rapidly, aggressively cut into profit margins and cause logistics issues. 

According to a recent study, the overall value of returned merchandise in the US during the past year was $309 billion, with online purchases accounting for $41 billion of that total. Now, the COVID-19 pandemic has complicated the issue of returns even more.

While it is an increasing problem, how retailers deal with returns can help differentiate them from competitors, reduce return costs, and even make them more profitable. 

How has COVID-19 Impacted Retail Returns?

COVID-19 Retail

Studies show that 30% of all products ordered online are returned as compared to 8.89% in brick-and-mortar stores. And as online sales have increased significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic, so has the volume of returns – increasing costs and complexity for retailers.

Along with higher return rates, the pandemic has exacerbated certain return challenges and created new ones altogether, for example:

  • Given the challenges associated with returning products to stores, retailers are having to offer extended return windows. 
  • Increased health and safety policies require stores to set aside returned merchandise for 24 hours to reduce COVID-19 transmission. For some retailers, thorough steam cleaning has become a popular sanitation measure. 
  • Retailers must find additional retail space and assign labour costs to their sanitation processes.
  • Retailers face higher consumer expectations when it comes to the efficiency of the return process and free online returns. However, the pandemic has caused reduced staffing across warehouses, delaying return processes for many stores.
  • Understaffed stores must find additional resources to restock returned merchandise back on the sales floor. 
  • The overhead associated with receiving and repacking merchandise for resale along with the disposal of unsaleable merchandise is increasingly cutting into profit margins. 

The good news is that retailers can take a number of steps to both reduce return rates and make the overall process more efficient and less costly.

How to Reduce the Cost of Returns 

1. Clearly communicate your pre-purchase return policy

Retail return policy

Establishing standard operating procedures for handling returns will make the process more efficient and less costly for your business.

A clearly communicated return policy will enable you to treat each return the same so you can avoid treating requests on a case by case basis. Processing every return manually can be expensive and overwhelm your staff, ultimately preventing you from scaling your business. 

While policies are going to vary depending on the industry and the type of retailer, every policy should include certain elements. To find out more about writing a return policy and the basics you should cover, click here

Once you have written up your policy, you need to make sure that customers see it before they buy. This means including links to your policy in hard to miss places on your website or e-commerce site, and near checkout tills in your physical stores. Clearly outlining your return policy will help set the right expectations before purchase, reducing hours spent on customer service.

2. Accurate online product information

Online product page

If you’re selling online, one way to reduce the likelihood of returns is by providing your customers with accurate product information. Depending on the type of merchandise that you sell, this could mean in-depth size guides, diagrams, or photos that clearly showcase the appearance of your products. Doing so will give your customers a better idea of what they are purchasing and they’ll end up more satisfied with their decision. 

Make sure that the information you provide on a certain page pertains to that particular product, category, and brand. For example, you don’t want to provide clothing size guides on a footwear product page. 

If you sell internationally, it’s suggested that you include links to international conversion charts or images of such charts on product pages as well as both metric and imperial measurements.

Retailers with physical stores may also want to provide the same product information in-store, especially if COVID-19 has impacted a customer’s ability to interact with products (e.g. if changing rooms are closed).

3. Customer reviews

Customer reviews

Featuring customer reviews and ratings on your website can play an important role in reducing returns. In fact, online reviews carry a lot of weight during a consumer’s path to purchase. According to Google, 88% of shoppers say they trust online reviews as much as personal recommendations.

Giving shoppers access to helpful, relevant reviews can give them a better understanding of the products they are considering and can help set expectations about functionality, quality, and usability. And by learning about others’ experiences with the product, shoppers can easily discern if it is right for them.

Customer reviews are a way for merchants to have a finger on the pulse of their business as they provide valuable shopper feedback that can be used to proactively reduce returns. For instance, reviews provide important insight about customer preferences (e.g. what type of shopper buys certain products and how they use them) as well as product flaws. Store owners should constantly be analyzing and reading customer feedback to identify ways that they can improve product quality and services.

Some retailers even use reviews to make important purchasing decisions – e.g. the number of inventory items that should be bought, whether or not to continue selling certain products etc. If specific products have an overwhelming amount of negative reviews, it is time to review the products or work with the supplier.

4. Use technology to optimize the handling of returned items

Retail technology

Many traditional retailers aren’t using systems designed to handle online returns which have increased a lot due to the recent boost in online shopping.

For many, the issue is managing returns once they reach a retail store or shipping facility. Most traditional stores are still new to handling online returns which can include everything from where to put inventory back into stock to processing refunds for online sales in-store. And returns can get even more complicated with multi-location retailers selling on different online channels.

For example, processing returns manually will require a lot more staff hours than returns handled by a system that properly restocks returned products based on the order status. This is a flaw with many retail sales systems as the focus is often on selling as many items as possible, and less thought is put into how to handle costly back office processes such as returns which can really cut into profit margins when not managed effectively.

While some systems will utilize 3rd party apps to manage returns, a complete retail platform will include built-in return features such as:

  1. Return Control Settings such as requiring receipts for returns, requiring return reasons that are tracked by users or a separate return screen to minimize the potential for employee theft.
  2. User Access Controls for Returns such as restricting access to return functions.
  3. In-Store Refunds for Online Sales at the physical location where returned products are actually inspected prior to refunds.
  4. Omnichannel Stock Control that puts returned products back into available stock in all online sales channels and at the location where they are returned immediately once the return order is finalized.

5. Direct returns to physical stores

Physical store

Offering customers a buy online return in-store (BORIS) option has become a popular practice amongst many omni-channel retailers. And for good reason; 88% of shoppers want to be able to return a purchase to a physical store or through a prepaid shipping method, according to Retail Dive. Additional research from Optoro shows that 66% of shoppers prefer to bring returns to stores rather than shipping them back

Besides making the process smoother for shoppers, directing returns to physical stores helps retailers save on:

1) The cost of packing materials and staff time to pack orders securely.

2) The shipping fees of returns which are commonly expected by shoppers today with online returns yet doubles the shipping costs for merchants.

3) The cost of damages or lost packages during transit. Even if a merchant has insurance, there are administrative costs to making constant claims.

4) The cost of compensating unhappy customers with additional or future discounts when shipments or refunds are delayed.

5) The higher payment fees charged by processors for online refunds vs. PCI compliant in-person refunds with EMV PIN pads.

But more importantly, returns in-store are more likely to increase the chance of converting a potential refund into an exchange, or even better, a larger sale if the shopper buys more than the original order.

In this way, even though returns can be costly, they can also be a way for a retailer to really differentiate and highlight their customer service. After all, according to Metapack:

92% of customers who receive a good return experience make repeat purchases

So optimizing how you handle returns can be a chance to interact with customers, provide them with a great shopping experience, and capture their loyalty for the long-term.

6. Offer buy online, pickup in-store (BOPIS)

Buy Online Pickup In-store

While there have been innovative strides taken in the retail industry to bridge the online and brick & mortar experience, even the best technology cannot replicate the in-store environment where customers can see and interact with products in person.

Oftentimes, returns are a result of customers not liking the product or the product not fitting properly. This can be reduced by providing a way for customers to touch or see the product in person before an order is complete. The ideal way to do this is with BOPIS which is also known as Click & Collect in some industries. For shoppers, it provides a convenient way for them to buy as well as return their purchases.

By offering a Buy Online Pickup In-store option, retailers provide their shoppers the convenience of online shopping with the interactive experience of purchasing in-store. And, of course, during the pandemic, this is a safer way for shoppers to buy yet still check their orders before taking them home.

Since the pandemic started this year, BOPIS orders are 275 percent higher than pre-COVID-19, even after stores reopened from lockdowns. Now that shoppers have been using store pickup for an extended period of time, studies show that consumers are unlikely to stop using BOPIS, even after the pandemic. This means that retailers need to find cost-effective ways to offer the service permanently with an omnichannel store system that can handle both sales and returns effectively based on the way people shop today.

Conclusion

Dealing with product returns is never fun, especially now with the complications brought on by COVID-19. However, when properly dealt with, retailers have the opportunity to minimize and even capitalize on returns. We hope our article outlined some of the ways to do so. 

What are you doing to minimize returns in-store? Let us know in the comment section below.

How to Choose a Great Retail POS System: 4 Important Factors

How to Choose a Great Retail POS System: 4 Important Factors

Whether you’re a long time merchant or you’re just starting out in retail, having the right POS system in place is crucial for your success.

A retail Point-Of-Sale system helps you simplify and manage all aspects of your business operations including sales, inventory, and customers. Even better, today’s innovative POS software is data-driven and includes marketing integrations designed to help you increase your revenue. 

In this article, we’ll take you through the key aspects that you should consider when choosing a retail POS system.

4 Things to Consider when Purchasing a New Retail POS System 

  1. Cloud vs On-Premise: First, you must decide whether you want to use a cloud-based or an on-premise retail POS system. The main difference between the two softwares has to do with how data is stored.

On-premise software is installed on specific devices and data from your POS is stored on a local database (e.g. a device in your store). Because the data is stored on a specific computer or device in your store, you can only access data if you are physically in the store. For example, you can compare it to having data (e.g. a document or report) stored on your computer at home – it cannot be accessed from anywhere else. 

On the other hand, cloud software stores data on a cloud server – meaning that it can be accessed from anywhere with an internet connection. A simple example for this would be using Dropbox or Google Drive – as long as you have an internet connection, your data can be accessed from anywhere. 

When deciding between the two types of POS software, you must consider which one is a better fit for your retail business. Click here for an in-depth comparison that will help you better understand the type of software that will best suit your operational needs.

cloud technology

2. Device Compatibility: It’s important to note that not all POS software works on all devices. So you must also consider compatibility with your existing devices when selecting a new POS software. Otherwise, you’ll need to invest a considerable amount of money (and time) in new hardware devices.

When narrowing down your POS options, look for compatibility with existing devices and hardware such as your POS terminals, credit card terminals, barcode scanners, etc.

Expert Tip! An important point to note is that just because a software is cloud-based, does not mean that it is compatible on any device!  

POS hardware

3. Training and Onboarding Costs: While you may be tempted to choose the cheapest POS software option, it’s important to look at cost of onboarding the solution into the overall ROI (return on investment) of investing in new POS technology. 

A POS system that is inexpensive but difficult to use can cost you a lot in the long term. This is especially true for high-traffic retailers that deal with peak periods and long lineups. It is also important for retailers with high turnover rates or seasonal peaks. If you are constantly training new staff members, you need to consider a solution with built-in training tools.

A user-friendly software that is easy to operate will speed up store operations and make for happier, more productive employees. This means a faster onboarding process and lower training costs for you! 

employee training

4. Scalability: Many retailers make the mistake of choosing a POS without thinking about business growth. While you may only have one retail location with minimal inventory now, there’s no way to know how quickly your retail operations will grow. That’s why it’s important to make a decision about a new POS with the goal of growing your retail business. 

This means that your POS software should be able to scale with you. Look out for the following features when selecting a retail POS software: 

  • the ability to handle high transaction and inventory volume

  • unlimited stores, selling zones, and stock allocations 

  • the ability to hand multi-currency and multi-language

  • automated tax calculations based on geographical location  

Many retail POS providers restrict the amount of stores and inventory amounts that can be used – meaning that you have to invest a substantial amount of money upgrading your POS plan or investing in a new POS altogether. So rather than wasting resources switching to a new POS provider, choose a POS software that supports store growth. 

Your Retail POS should grow with you

We hope you found this article helpful!

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#retailpointofsale #cloudpointofsale #howtochooseapossystem #retailpointofsaletips #builtforretail 

Mother’s Day Marketing Tips For E-Commerce Retailers

Mother’s Day Marketing Tips For E-Commerce Retailers

Considering everything that is going on with the Coronavirus outbreak, Mother’s Day 2020 is taking place at an unusual time. But even though consumer shopping habits and behaviour have changed dramatically since COVID-19 was declared a pandemic, shoppers are still planning to celebrate. 

In fact, according to the NRF, 78% of consumers say that celebrating Mother Day’s is important to them.  

Let’s take a look at how retailers can adjust their marketing strategies in light of the pandemic and take advantage of how shoppers are adapting their spending and gifting plans.

3 Easy Ways to Boost E-commerce Sales this Mother’s Day

1. Highlight your Best Products 

Feature Mother's Day Products

In previous years, special outings such as spa treatments and restaurant dinners were growing in popularity as Mother’s Day gift options. In 2019, the NRF stated 55% of shoppers planned to gift a special outing for Mother’s Day, spending an average of $36.41 per person. 

This year however, purchasing “experiences” is no longer an option for shoppers. Instead, the focus shifts towards gifting products with houseware, books or CDs, and electronics being the most popular gift categories.  

So make your merchandise stand out by putting a spotlight on Mother’s Day. You can do so by featuring Mother’s Day related products on the homepage of your e-commerce store.

Many e-commerce providers, including TAKU eCommerce, allow merchants to highlight specific merchandise by adding featured products to their store homepage. Featured products help retailers attract customer attention to certain items in their store and sell them faster. Here are a few tips when it comes to highlighting your merchandise:

  • Place your best-sellers on your homepage 
  • Showcase a different assortment of products
  • Attract attention to new arrivals 
  • Display any discounts or promotions 

2. Take Advantage of Social Media 

Mother's Day social media campaigns

With the vast majority (71%) of shoppers under stay-at-home mandates and social distancing orders, it’s safe to say that consumers are spending more time online. 

Leveraging social media platforms such as Facebook and Instagram that allow you to sell products directly, can help boost Mother’s Day exposure and sales. Here are a few things to keep in mind when promoting on social media: 

  • Promote discounts and offers; many shoppers are dealing with financial hardships, health concerns, and other burdens due to COVID-19 and may not be in the position to purchase gifts. In fact, the vast majority of shoppers that are spending less on Mother’s Day this year say it is due to the impact of COVID-19. Promoting discounts, offers, and giveaways is a great way to give back to your shoppers while giving your e-commerce brand more exposure and loyalty. 
  • Sell on Instagram and Facebook Shop: with billions of monthly active users, it is guaranteed that your customers are already on Facebook and Instagram. You can take advantage of their popularity to reach more customers and boost sales. Providing a way for them to browse and buy your products directly also increases the likelihood that they will make a purchase. All shoppers have to do is click on the “Shop” or “Store” tab to view your products. To find out how you can set up Facebook Shop in a few easy steps, click here . For more information on how to sell on Instagram, click here.

3. Provide Convenience 

Offer Curbside Delivery and Pickup Options

Providing shoppers with convenience in a time of crisis can go a long way in building trust and loyalty. As retail expert Doug Stephens explains “when the Covid-19 crisis eventually ends, consumers won’t begin searching for brands they hope they can trust. They will choose brands they already believe they can trust based on previously observed actions.”

Here are a few ways you can provide your shoppers with convenience this Mother’s Day: 

  • Offer contactless pickup and delivery options: With stores closed, shoppers still want a way to give something special to their moms. Offering the safety and convenience of contactless curbside pickup or delivery makes shopping easier for customers, gives them more flexibility,  and helps them save on shipping costs. In turn, this boosts customer loyalty while strengthening your brand image. If you would like to learn how to set up curbside pickup in a few simple steps on TAKU eCommerce, click here
  • Be helpful: try to be helpful instead of salesy in your Mother’s Day marketing campaign. Consider creating a Mother’s Day gift guide on your website or offer DIY gift ideas etc.
  • Mother’s Day free shipping: 71% of shoppers are concerned about the pandemic’s impact on their personal health and financial stability. Offering free shipping can help alleviate some of the financial burden that your shoppers may be experiencing.

We hope you found this article helpful!

Happy selling and Happy Mother’s Day!